Terri Timely Makes Amazing Short Films

Terri Timely is a film-making duo from Oakland, CA.  Corey Creasey and Ian Kibbey mix a quirky visual style with great music and “pop-goes-the-weasel” timed delivery of a witty message.  I’d call it a mix between Wes Anderson, Tim & Eric and Norman Rockwell.  Not surprisingly, these dudes are scoring some big time commercials now for major brands like MTV and Nissan…But the real gold is their short films.  Be sure to check out Cecil and Children Are Gift on their website, but first, watch the inspiring Synesthesia below…

syn·es·the·sia syn·aes·the·sia (sĭn’ĭs-thē’zhə)


A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.

A sensation felt in one part of the body as a result of stimulus applied to another, as in referred pain.

The description of one kind of sense impression by using words that normally describe another.

The Amazing Architecture of Santiago Calatrava

Thanks to El Boz for the dose of inspiration below…behold the stunning architecture and structural engineering of Santiago Calatrava.

Auditorio De Tenerife – Tenerife, Spain // The Distinctive Concrete shell roof takes its inspiration directly form the landscape of Tenerife set against the Atlantic Ocean. The massive arc swooping up and over the building like a wave takes on symbolic power, serving not only the building that houses a modern 1558 seat auditorium for music and culture but also as a focal point for the islands.


Turning Torso - Malmo, Sweden // A residential tower that serves as a symbol of the revitalization of an important urban area from a decaying industryl zone into a thriving seaside neighborhood. The building is composed of 9 cube units weigh triangular yips. Each unit is a sub-building housing 5 floors. at 190 meters, the Turning Torso is the tallest residential building in Sweden.

Mind Your MeTweets

You know how when someone compliments you, the first thing you do is e-mail everyone you know to tell them about the compliment?

No, you probably don’t, because you have the good sense not to do something like that.

Why then do so many people feel no shame in rampantly retweeting compliments they receive on Twitter? Some examples, with names changed to protect the guilty:

“RT @joesmith I just heard the most wonderful speech from @lisafrench. That girl is a genius.” (retweeted by @lisafrench)

“RT @fred24 Just saw @jasongotham’s redesign. So good. So jealous!” (retweeted by @jasongotham)

“RT @cakester Scrummify’s sign-up process is a thing of beauty.” (retweeted by @scrummify or an employee of Scrummify)

Let’s count the number of things wrong with this practice:

  1. In real life, it’s considered impolite to brag. Unless you are authoring an anonymous satirical account on Twitter, this is your real life.
  2. If your intent is to spread a compliment your product received, you’re spreading it to people who are already believers, or at the very least, already aware of your product. You want other people to spread it. Oh wait, they already are.
  3. You’re filling your followers’ Twitter feeds not with your own thoughts, but with other people’s thoughts… thoughts about you. The practice of retweeting insults about you on Twitter can also be controversial, but that’s a different beast altogether; one that aims to dismantle trollery by elevating it ironically.

I know many people view Twitter as a medium that can be used by anyone in any manner they see fit — without regard to how other people use it or how other people think it should be used — but I’m not really talking about Twitter here. I’m talking about basic manners. Your mom taught you them when you were young. They haven’t changed that much.

Try not to forget them.